Random: Stereotypes from Google Images

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While working on the concept for a magazine concept with this guy, we began to have a little argument about children.

I had suggested an image of a cute kid (above) and he immediately told me that that kid was “too cute to be Kenyan”. So we got into a little discussion about what Kenyan children really look like.

This inevitably became a question that was too difficult for our meagre minds. So we turned to the all knowing, all savvy, Google images. This is what we found:

Google image result for "Kenyan Children"

Fairly accurate. But someone immediately pointed out that they wondered how accurate this would be for other countries/regions. Below are the findings from our exercise. Continue reading

#KiberaRoadTrip: Be Part of The Solution

It all started with Trey Songz’ tweeting one fateful morning.

The backlash was ridiculous. People immediately assumed the worst,took this as an attack on Kenya and retaliated accordingly. There’s no need to point out how fallacious that logic is. That horse is long dead and has been beaten to no end.

As our brother from another blogger, Archer, was on radio that afternoon, he said that maybe people needed to actually stop screaming at Trey and start redirecting their efforts towards bettering their community. He explained that he himself hadn’t been to Kibera, at which point I suggested that I’d gladly take him there and show him some of the things we can effortlessly do to help. The idea caught on and, with the help of @AKenyanGirl and @VisionAfrica we were able to plan out the first of what will hopefully be many trips to Kibera to come.

The name may be a misleading misnomer; the aim is not to tour the slums. What we want to do is to help people direct their efforts exactly where they are needed, to pair each person with a suitable cause so that we can all make a contribution towards bettering life in Kibera. Continue reading

“PG-13” – A Case Against Children, Weddings & TV

BY AKELLOVE

Shocked Baby

I don’t like kids. I’m sorry. I don’t. Okay I’m not really sorry. But it sounds more politically correct to claim that I am. Not to say that I hate everyone who continues to (unceasingly) propagate their lineage. It’s your choice if you enjoy not being able to sleep for the next 18 years of your life. *shrug* But that’s another post. That maybe, one day, I’ll write when I don’t feel like being lynched by women everywhere. Couple of guys, too. Because really, who WANTS to be lynched? There’s a thin line between masochism and stupidity. Continue reading

Spare The Rod?

Dearly beloved,

We are gathered here today to say ‘kwaheri’ (farewell) to something that’s been a member of every Kenyan household and very dear to our hearts and indeed our bums for decades. Today we say adieu to the ‘kiboko’ a.k.a. the ‘cane’ or the ‘rod’. Here in Kenya, the kiboko has touched the lives of many both young while in the hands of ‘loving’ parents, equally ‘concerned’ relatives and friends and not forgetting those overzealous school teachers. Personally, I could say I owe my relatively turbulent-free formative years to the kiboko for putting the fear of God in me and keeping me on the straight and narrow path.

As you are aware, the kiboko met its fatal demise on August 27th 2010 at around 10:25pm at Uhuru Park with the promulgation of the New Constitution of Kenya. Continue reading