Ruto’s Mansion NEEDS Those Renovations

You guys! Look at this house!

ruto house

Be honest. You think it’s a piece of sh*t too, yeah?

It’s horrible the conditions they’re making our Deputy President live in. I mean, it’s a 10 acre, half a billion shilling house with two 3-bedroom maisonettes as servants’ quarters. What type of shoddy living conditions are those? And then when our Deputy President who’s cried tried so hard for Kenyans asks for a measly 100 or so million shillings to renovate the place, we all get angry? Why? I think he’s earned the right to allocate money that could buy dialysis machines and renovate 100 schools to pimpin’ his pad, don’t you? And if you’re mad at 100M, wait till you find out the real cost of those renovations is actually close to 200M. You’ll lose your heads!

But what are these renovations, you may be asking? Well, I’ll let our Dep Prez walk you through the main ones*. Continue reading

#VPmeetup: Questions for Kalonzo

I’m supposedly going to be part of a group meeting with this country’s current Vice President and Presidential aspirant, Kalonzo Musyoka. Ama Stevo, mkipenda. I’m assuming I’ll get an opportunity to ask a few questions and was wondering what you guys have to ask him.

I only have one question: given that the country has only gotten worse since he got into government(way back in the KANU days), I need to know why exactly I – or anyone for that matter – should elect him as an agent of change and a leader of people? Why trust a man who’s done nothing in two decades besides keep a clean sheet?

That’s my question. What are yours?

The Politics of Kenyan Lawyers

In my freshman year at Law School, I remember hearing the phrase: ‘law is politics and politics is law’, which later made sense to me since the ruling party of the day has a hand in both the enactment and implementation of any country’s laws. It is therefore a widely accepted fact that most lawyers are drawn to politics, particularly to the floor of the elected House as members of the legislature and then the executive.

In the US, for instance, 26 out of the 44 Presidents were lawyers including the incumbent Barack Obama. Here in Kenya, our President and Prime Minister may not be lawyers but we have a Cabinet littered with legal practioners starting with the Vice-President Kalonzo Musyoka. By willingly accepting the unenviable role of the President’s special envoy on the deferral of the ICC trials of the “Hague Six”, many have questioned why the V-P failed to advise the President both as a lawyer and a former Foreign Affairs Minister, on the contents of the Rome Statute.
In Kalonzo’s defence, his boss, the President has not been a shining example of good leadership either. And as far as flip-flopping and opportunism goes, who can forget when Kibaki, one of the world’s longest serving MPs, once infamously said that to try remove Kanu from power was to cut the mugumo tree with a razor – only later to leave Kanu and form DP.

But I digress.

My thesis is simple: for as long as our country will continue producing lawyers, there will no doubt be a fair number of them who cross over from the corridors of justice to the annals of political power. So allow me to briefly canvas a few of your legally-inclined politicians.

Continue reading