“An Open Letter to Capital FM”


Editor: The following letter is from @BintiM, a close friend of the blog. It voices an opinion shared by many on the reckless abuse of social media by the Capital in the Morning crew. It’s a good thing she wrote it because she’s a lot nicer than I am; and a lot of the complaints we’ve heard about it were a lot more incendiary. But an issue like this does require a calm voice, lest it get blown out of proportion.

Words By BINTIM

“Dear Capital Fm,

I write this letter to express my strong disapproval and disappointment with one of your Twitter accounts @984inthemorning. Continue reading

The SoapBox: “Southern Sudan and Convenient Patriotism”


It’s annoyingly hard to not know what’s going on in Southern Sudan right now; every national media outlet has dedicated so much airtime to it that it’s apparently become a national priority. But as they vie for their independence from the rest of Sudan and bleed rivers for their struggles, at one point or another, we must all have wondered what our responsibility – or rather our interest – is really based on.

In one word: Continue reading

Spare The Rod?

Dearly beloved,

We are gathered here today to say ‘kwaheri’ (farewell) to something that’s been a member of every Kenyan household and very dear to our hearts and indeed our bums for decades. Today we say adieu to the ‘kiboko’ a.k.a. the ‘cane’ or the ‘rod’. Here in Kenya, the kiboko has touched the lives of many both young while in the hands of ‘loving’ parents, equally ‘concerned’ relatives and friends and not forgetting those overzealous school teachers. Personally, I could say I owe my relatively turbulent-free formative years to the kiboko for putting the fear of God in me and keeping me on the straight and narrow path.

As you are aware, the kiboko met its fatal demise on August 27th 2010 at around 10:25pm at Uhuru Park with the promulgation of the New Constitution of Kenya. Continue reading

When The Elderly Need A Spanking

Old woman fight

The Nation TV News Broadcast on Saturday night began with a scene of old ladies getting teargassed during a peaceful protest in Riuru. There was a lot of talk of “shame” and “horror” as though the act of opposing old women on a warpath was condemnable by death.

Oh no, don’t get me wrong. I don’t think anyone should go around kicking vintage asses just to make a point. Especially this particular group that appeared to be so entirely innocent. I do however sometimes question just how innocent the elderly are. You see, my greatest concern is that they have immunity – Carte Blanche, even – by to do whatever they want without repercussion, virtue of their age. And I think they know this…

Case in point, last week I found out that Devil does not wear Prada; unless Prada was the name of the dead animal this particular bag of bones was wearing. Continue reading

Utumishi Kwa Wote

Every time I see a cop, I tense up. It’s reflex. And no, it’s not just because of my hair.

It’s more because somewhere in my Kenyan life, I realised that cops were far more scary than thugs.

Some weeks back, Maina Kageni was promoting Safcom’s latest offer on Matatu FM. Something about Opera Mini, 10MB, and 8 bob. He asked guys to call in and explain how and why they use it.

This one guy called in. He was very eloquent, spoke pretty good English with a bit of slang thrown in. I think he might have been from Buru [don’t ask me why].

I was paying attention until he said he was a cop. Apparently, he uses his Safcom to browse while he works.

The only part that Maina heard was ‘cop’. He immediately diverted to ‘Afande vipi’  mode, and the previously polished cop downgraded to the Kiganjo accent. He and Maina carried a two-minute dialogue in full policeman register, complete with the mixtures of Cs and Gs. It should have been quite funny, but I just got upset. Continue reading