Daily Dozen: 12/01


Contenders for Chief Justice and President of the Supreme Court [KenyanJurist]
Proof that Moi ruled Kenya for 24 years while semi-literate [DN]
On the rise of Women [TEDtalks]
“Southern Sudan and Convenient Patriotism” [Very Interesting]
Gabrielle Giffords’ Shooting: The Impact on Obama’s Presidency [TIME]
Has the Church Failed Us? [AfricaUnchained]
The Five Things About A Wedding Men Care About [UIGM]
The 41 Places to Go in 2011 [NYT]
What FIFA mean by awarding Messi is that winning the World Cup is worth nothing. [Guardian]
CSI Tamasha [Milonare]
The Misconception & The Truth About Procrastination [Some Blogger]
Google Reveals Its 2011 YouTube Symphony Orchestra, Vuvuzela’s Included [FC]

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When Mandela Dies…

Two months ago, my biggest fear was that Mr. Nelson Mandela would meet his tragic demise before getting a chance to witness the first World Cup ever on African soil only a bus trip away from his palatial home in Bishopscourt, Cape Town. You may not agree with me on this but I truly believe it was Mandela that brought the World Cup to Africa, through his name, his symbolic status and the country he helped liberate from apartheid. And for that, we should all be grateful.

Yesterday, Mr. Nelson Mandela (as children of the soil we’re allowed to call him ‘Tata Madiba’) celebrated his 92nd birthday. It goes without question that South Africa and indeed the world at large adore and revere Madiba and have deified him to the point where the United Nations has declared July 18th “International Nelson Mandela Day”.
Understand this, the only International Days the UN has declared so far have to do with Children, Human Rights, Women, the Environment and such. So, yes, it’s a big deal for *a person*, *any person* let alone Mandela to have such an honour bestowed upon them. Gandhi, Mother Teresa, Martin Luther King and a few others (may their souls rest in peace) must be literally turning multiple shades of green envious of Madiba.

All that being said, Mandela will one day die. Don’t shoot the messenger. Just hear me out.

Continue reading

World Cup: The Worst Eleven

FIFA introduced the brand new ball known as the Jabulani; as a result many a goalkeeper was Jabulani-ed in South Africa. Sometimes, however, that was no excuse. At the same time there is a difference between a Rookie and a Pro. Where Part 1 focused on the players who excelled, Part 2 will focus on the players who were pathetic, and did not deserve to represent their nations. Continue reading

What To Do Now That The World Cup is Done

Spain win world cup

Spain won, Netherlands lost and though the lot of us cheered or wept. Though very few amongst us were true supporters of either team, one could nary find an empty seat on Sunday night. This is the power of the phenomenon that is the World Cup. For the majority of the population(especially the testosterone based population), our schedules have been revolving around game times. People who were previously unable to remember their wedding anniversaries or children’s birthdays managed to map out 64 games over 30 days and squeeze them in between their regular lives. Because, as a friend of mine wisely said to his wife, “I fell in love with the World Cup before I even met you.”

Cold words, true sentiment. But now that the tournament is over and the vuvuzelas are no longer abuzz, one has to wonder…what next? Continue reading

3 Football Greats Who Want To Rule the World

In terms of excitement, drama and tension, the last eight of a World Cup is where the tournament really starts. The weak and the feeble — in other words, England — have gone home and the real heavyweights remain.

DIEGO FORLAN (URUGUAY)

Games: 4.
Minutes played: 360.
Goals: 2.
Attack stats: Both his goals have come against African sides.

Like Klose, he loves the World Cup. Even back in 2002 when he was a laughing stock in England because of his troubles in front of goal with Manchester United, Forlan found that this tournament suited him. Forlan remains the talisman, taking the penalties, the free-kicks and even the corners.

A thoroughly nice guy, too. It’s hard not to feel pleased for him.

He’s a rock star: Forlan helped to end 40 years of hurt for Uruguay as they reached the last eight for the first time since 1970

ENRIQUE VERA (PARAGUAY)

Games: 4.
Minutes played: 388.
Goals: 1.
Attack stats: Paraguay has won every time Vera scores for his country.

Having spent all of his 12-year professional career in Southern and Central America, Vera is not exactly a household name in Europe but at home in Paraguay the 31-year-old playmaker is being credited with being the brains behind his country’s surprising passage to the last eight.

As you may have noticed, Paraguay are not exactly the most exciting team in this World Cup. But watch Vera play and you will see the intelligence of his football and the way that he is going some way to compensating for the poor form of their usual talisman, Manchester City’s Roque Santa Cruz.

ARJEN ROBBEN (HOLLAND)

Games: 2.
Minutes played: 88.
Goals: 1.
Attack stats: Holland have won 11 of the 12 matches in which Robben has scored, drawing with Germany in the other.

The man who took Bayern Munich to the Champions League final almost single-handedly came late to this tournament as he was once again struck down by injury.

Since his arrival as a substitute in Holland’s final group game against Cameroon, however, he has made a sublime and memorable impact. The amazing thing about the former Chelsea winger is that he seems to have one stock party trick… and nobody seems to be able to stop it. Receiving the ball wide — on either flank — he will cut inside on a diagonal course and strike vicious shots with his left foot.

Africa, Its Our Time to Shine.

Hi, I’m NV
and I am an African;
I owe my being to Genus Kenyapithecus (google it), the cradle of human kind, inseparable to the end.
Like Little foot, will not be defeated without encore and standing ovation.

I owe my being to the dusty plains of the Serengeti, the trans frontier parks the trees, the earth, the the rain forest, the rivers, the caves and seas of this beloved continent.

I am stronger than the mighty Zambezi longer than the Nile;
I am the son of the slaves who build the wealth of this planet, north and south and east,
the migrant workers shedding the last sweat in mines and farms, displaced in foreign land but resilient to the end.

I am the Black Stars of Ghana, a symbol of African emancipation and unity in the struggle against colonialism and injustices, I listen to the elders and embrace forgiveness;

I am the Rainbow Boys, Bafana Bafana of South Africa, uniting the nation re kindling the light of hope.

I am the Waza, where the Indomitable Lions of Cameroon, king of the jungle roam, so watch out guys;

I am the Gashaka-Gumti, the Cross river where the Super Eagles of Nigeria with binoculous eyes patrol the field ready to pounce

Resilience, devious, defensive, camouflaged and territorial, I am the Desert Fox of Algeria.

The Living Africa, where the Elephants of Cote D’lvoire (Ivory Coast) roam freely opponents afraid to approach.

I am an African, I am the beat of the Jembe drum;
I am the sound of the Vuvuzela echoeing under the African Sky;
Fifa world cup football uniting everyone, where it all began.

The African National soccer teams in the FIFA World Cup

1. Bafana Bafana, South Africa.
2. The Black Stars of Ghana.
3. Indomitable Lions of Cameroon.
4. Super Eagles of Nigeria.
5. Desert Fox of Algeria.
6. The Elephants of Ivory Coast.

Show dem guys show dem, dont give up without encore and standing ovations. Show dem how we do it in Africa.

WAVE DEM FLAGS, FLAGS FLAGS, WAVE YOUR FLAG

I am waving mine, in support of all the African teams!